the-metalsmith-apprentice



Reblogged from sillyhardy
sillyhardy:

Commenting on FB about my next tattoo I was scouring the net for Alphonse Mucha ‘cause that’s the design I want and I found this, isn’t it just gorgeous?
Alphonse Mucha (Czech, 1860-1939). Pendant Cascade, ca. 1900. Gold, enamel, opals, diamonds and Baroque pearls. 12 x 5 cm (4 11/16 x 1 3/16 in.). Petit Palais, Musée des Beaux-Arts de la Ville de Paris.
© Mucha Trust 2009 / Photo © Petit Palais, Roger-Viollet

sillyhardy:

Commenting on FB about my next tattoo I was scouring the net for Alphonse Mucha ‘cause that’s the design I want and I found this, isn’t it just gorgeous?

Alphonse Mucha (Czech, 1860-1939). Pendant Cascade, ca. 1900. Gold, enamel, opals, diamonds and Baroque pearls. 12 x 5 cm (4 11/16 x 1 3/16 in.). Petit Palais, Musée des Beaux-Arts de la Ville de Paris.

© Mucha Trust 2009 / Photo © Petit Palais, Roger-Viollet

(via artnouveaustyle)

Reblogged from mediumaevum

artofthedarkages:

anglosaxonfragments:

mediumaevum:

Decoding Anglo-Saxon art

Rosie Weetch, curator and Craig Williams, illustrator, British Museum

Read the whole blog here: http://blog.britishmuseum.org/2014/05/28/decoding-anglo-saxon-art/

Anglo-Saxon metalworkers were like the Michelangelo of the 8th century!

(via phobs-heh)

Reblogged from mediumaevum

mediumaevum:

  1. Ottonian crown on display at Essen’s cathedral treasury, ca. 1100. Long believed to be the infant crown of king of Romans Otto III
  2. Long called the Crown of St. Louis and thought to have been made in Paris, the Crown of Liège, acquired by the Louvre in 1947, is now known to be a Mosan piece (late 13th century)
  3. Crown of Elizabeth Kotromanic (born ca. 1339) in Zadar, given by Louis I of Hungary

(via phobs-heh)

Reblogged from pearl-nautilus
pearl-nautilus:

Probably the most famous pieces by Lucien Gaillard are his horn made hair pins featuring two intricate dragonflies exquisitely enameled. Less famous than his Art Nouveau contemporaries Lalique, Fouquet or Vever, his best pieces reach the same level of creativity and master craftsmanship. Lucien was the third generation of a Parisienne family of jewelers that had become known for their Japanese inspired metalwork and Lucien’s creations transpire the same influence. He has become famous for incorporating horn into his extremely delicate creations. Unfortunately, he made very few pieces and on the rare occasions when one becomes available, the prices are astronomical. A few examples of his work can be found today at the Museum D’Orsay in Paris and at the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam.

pearl-nautilus:

Probably the most famous pieces by Lucien Gaillard are his horn made hair pins featuring two intricate dragonflies exquisitely enameled. Less famous than his Art Nouveau contemporaries Lalique, Fouquet or Vever, his best pieces reach the same level of creativity and master craftsmanship. Lucien was the third generation of a Parisienne family of jewelers that had become known for their Japanese inspired metalwork and Lucien’s creations transpire the same influence. He has become famous for incorporating horn into his extremely delicate creations. Unfortunately, he made very few pieces and on the rare occasions when one becomes available, the prices are astronomical. A few examples of his work can be found today at the Museum D’Orsay in Paris and at the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam.

(via tawnyscostumesandcuriosities)

Reblogged from nativeamericannews
nativeamericannews:

Joseph Begay is a full blooded Native American jeweler born into the Navajo Nation in 1964. http://bit.ly/1tck3MH

nativeamericannews:

Joseph Begay is a full blooded Native American jeweler born into the Navajo Nation in 1964. http://bit.ly/1tck3MH

Reblogged from art-of-swords
art-of-swords:

Vajra Water Knife
Date: ca. 15th century
Culture: Tibet
Medium: Iron damascened with gold and silver
Dimensions: H. 9 1/2 in. (24.1 cm); W. 2 7/8 in. (7.3 cm)
Classification: Metalwork
Credit Line: Lent by Anthony d’Offay
Rights and Reproduction: Photograph © Rossi & Rossi
A wavelike steel blade emitting from a makara (sea monster) and a wave-form hilt earned this blade the title Vajra Water Knife (Tibetan: dorjey chutri).
The makara has an elephant’s trunk and tusks, which are bizarrely paired with the jaws of a crocodile and the flowing mane of a lioness. The traditional Indian makara of antiquity has an aquatic tail, which here, filtered through the Tibetan imagination, has become a great foaming wave.
A variant of the traditional flaying knife (Tibetan: triguk), this blade is a masterpiece of gold and silver workmanship. The contrasting metals damascened into the iron surface create a ritual utensil of threatening beauty.

Source: Metropolitan Museum of Art 

art-of-swords:

Vajra Water Knife

  • Date: ca. 15th century
  • Culture: Tibet
  • Medium: Iron damascened with gold and silver
  • Dimensions: H. 9 1/2 in. (24.1 cm); W. 2 7/8 in. (7.3 cm)
  • Classification: Metalwork
  • Credit Line: Lent by Anthony d’Offay
  • Rights and Reproduction: Photograph © Rossi & Rossi

A wavelike steel blade emitting from a makara (sea monster) and a wave-form hilt earned this blade the title Vajra Water Knife (Tibetan: dorjey chutri).

The makara has an elephant’s trunk and tusks, which are bizarrely paired with the jaws of a crocodile and the flowing mane of a lioness. The traditional Indian makara of antiquity has an aquatic tail, which here, filtered through the Tibetan imagination, has become a great foaming wave.

A variant of the traditional flaying knife (Tibetan: triguk), this blade is a masterpiece of gold and silver workmanship. The contrasting metals damascened into the iron surface create a ritual utensil of threatening beauty.

Source: Metropolitan Museum of Art 

(via sarurunkamui)

Reblogged from fashionsfromhistory
fashionsfromhistory:

Buckle
Liberty & Co
Jessie M. King
1913
United Kingdom

fashionsfromhistory:

Buckle

Liberty & Co

Jessie M. King

1913

United Kingdom

(Source: collectionsonline.lacma.org, via heaveninawildflower)

Reblogged from fishstickmonkey
fishstickmonkey:

Bird-shaped incense burner

Object Name: Incense burner
Date: 12th–13th century
Geography: Central Asia or Eastern Iran
Culture: Islamic
Medium: Bronze; cast, pierced, and engraved
Dimensions: 9 13/16 x 3 9/16 x 7 3/8 in. (25 x 9 x 18.8 cm)
Classification: Metal
Metropolitan Museum of Art

fishstickmonkey:

Bird-shaped incense burner

Object Name: Incense burner
Date: 12th–13th century
Geography: Central Asia or Eastern Iran
Culture: Islamic
Medium: Bronze; cast, pierced, and engraved
Dimensions: 9 13/16 x 3 9/16 x 7 3/8 in. (25 x 9 x 18.8 cm)
Classification: Metal

(via superkintaro)

Reblogged from tumuseum

tumuseum:

Temple Pendant with Filigree Border, 11th–12th century. Kievan Rus’, Viking.

Overall: 2 x 2 3/16 x 5/8 in. (5.1 x 5.5 x 1.6 cm)

Reblogged from cooperhewitt
cooperhewitt:

Brooch, 1909-1918. Silver, enamel. Gift of Harry C. Sigman. 2013-21-26.See more stuff from the Product Design and Decorative Arts department

cooperhewitt:

Brooch, 1909-1918. Silver, enamel. Gift of Harry C. Sigman. 2013-21-26.

See more stuff from the Product Design and Decorative Arts department

(via heaveninawildflower)

Reblogged from momoyama-gallery
momoyama-gallery:

Available at Momoyama Gallery and on Trocadero.
Cast iron relief tetsubin from the Edo period (1603-1868).

momoyama-gallery:

Available at Momoyama Gallery and on Trocadero.

Cast iron relief tetsubin from the Edo period (1603-1868).

(via superkintaro)

Reblogged from moomin53
nothingnouveau:

Art Nouveau - organic and curvilinear shapes, inspired by natural forms and elements, tendrils
Lucien Gaillard

nothingnouveau:

Art Nouveau - organic and curvilinear shapes, inspired by natural forms and elements, tendrils

Lucien Gaillard

(Source: moomin53, via tawnyscostumesandcuriosities)

Reblogged from kamiizumi

Reblogged from kamiizumi

Reblogged from cooperhewitt
cooperhewitt:

Arthur Georg Jensen, Georg Jensen Sølvsmedie, Brooch, 1904–08. Silver, agate, amber. Museum purchase from Decorative Arts Association Acquisition Fund. 1989-98-1.See more stuff from the Product Design and Decorative Arts department

cooperhewitt:

Arthur Georg Jensen, Georg Jensen Sølvsmedie, Brooch, 1904–08. Silver, agate, amber. Museum purchase from Decorative Arts Association Acquisition Fund. 1989-98-1.

See more stuff from the Product Design and Decorative Arts department

(via heaveninawildflower)